Battle Choral Society


                                    Battle Choral Society Newsletter

Autumn Newsletter 

 Dear Concert goer,                                                                                                                        

Our May concert consisted of choral works 
(and a symphony) by the young Mozart that displayed the early flowering of his 
genius and brought out one of the finest performances by the choir that I can 
recall in over thirty years.

 

Modesty forbids extensive quotation from 
the review of this concert, which appeared in the Rye and Battle Observer, 
(though it is available on our website battlechoral.co.uk), but I can reveal 
that the words ‘glimpse of Heaven’ appear in the second paragraph.  

Currently we are rehearsing for our
November concert:
L. BERNSTEIN
Chichester
Psalms
 B. BRITTEN
St  
Nicolas Cantata
Church 
of St John the Evangelist 
Pevensey 
Rd
St
Leonards

7.30pm
November 
25th

The Chichester Psalms, commissioned by a 
music loving Dean of Chichester Cathedral, have all the rhythmic vitality and 
tunefulness of this composer’s other great masterpiece, West Side Story, and 
are most memorable for the beautiful contribution of the treble solo,

 immortalized 

on disc by the young Aled Jones. 

The first thing to say about Benjamin Britten’s 

account of the man who was Santa Claus is that it contains no mention of Father 
Christmas. However, unlike Santa, whose career only really took off when he was
old enough to grow a bushy white beard, the wondrous works of Britten’s Nicolas 
begin at the very moment of his birth and continue through his life, showing a 
versatility that makes driving reindeer over starlit rooftops seem fairly 
routine.   
How to describe the music of St Nicolas? Exuberant, 
childlike (the children’s choir is both touching and dramatic), tuneful, 
interactive- on two occasions the audience joins in to great effect- and, in the final ‘Death of Nicolas’, very moving.  Our former director of music, John Springford, 
attended a performance of St Nicolas shortly after the composer’s death, in 
which his beloved companion Peter Pears was singing the important solo tenor 
part that Britten had written for him.  The 
effect on the audience, as Pears broke through the wild introduction to this 
section with the words ‘Death, I hear thy summons and come in haste’ was, 
according to John, electrifying,  and no 
less moving was the final chorale: ‘God moves in a mysterious way his wonders 
to perform.’

This promises to be a delightful and 
exhilarating evening.
FOR YOUR DIARY:


 Our 
next concert comprises

J HAYDN

‘Nelson’ 
Mass

 

JS 
BACH

Magnificat 

Venue

TBC

May 
19th 2018 
Haydn’s greatest  and most popular setting of the Catholic Mass
and Bach at his very best, ‘shining with trumpets’.

 

Best wishes

Patrick Rice-Oxley

Chairman

 

 







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